Surviving high school: A guide for the class of 2025

Jessica Sarrach ‘24, News Editor

At the end of each year, eighth graders make the massive jump from middle school to high school. The transition can be scary as high school leaves much to the unknown, with new schedules, course loads, and students. Though with proper guidance, the phasing into teenage life is not too dreadful.

The first days in the halls of South Lyon High School can initially seem overwhelming or perhaps daunting, especially without people there to guide you through. Freshman Monica Vaughn said, “Do a fall sport so you can meet other freshmen and upperclassmen; it makes the first days so much less stressful.” Vaughn joined cross-country the fall of her freshman year and considers it to be one of her best choices. She has a strong viewpoint that getting involved with school before you start school makes adjusting to high school life that much easier.

While getting involved is important, it is also important to stay focused. Many people start high school by trying to sort out their priorities. Junior Kaitlyn Sartori said, “Treasure the friendships you make, they are the most important thing in high school.” Sartori stresses the need to create a community that you can rely on in high school. Another thing to consider is the type of friends you’re making, it’s best to look for people who will support you and your goals. With friends by your side, school and life can seem less daunting.

While holding strong friendships is very important, focusing on personal objectives should also hold much importance in one’s high school career. Freshman Abby Puzemis said, “Get to know as many people as possible. Everyone is new, so putting yourself out there isn’t a bad thing.” She also suggested, “ Also get good grades to start the year off so that you’re not cramming everything in at the end of the year.” One of the biggest struggles of high school can be to find the balance between work and pleasure. To keep organized it might help to set up a digital calendar or planner. Setting aside time to work on school work as well as spending time with friends can be very beneficial.

Through the course of high school, it can be easy to let academics take a back seat to fun. Freshman Mackenzie Csapo said, “Make sure you complete all your schoolwork. Don’t think just because you have a good grade, one missing assignment won’t do anything.” High school in all of its glory has a sole purpose: to teach. When in high school, take advantage of the academic opportunities you are provided with and do not let your grades and assignments fall too far behind.

High school can be extremely stressful, so sometimes you just need to take a step back. Sophomore Zoe Noechel said, “Don’t be too hard on yourself, your body needs a break in order to strive.” While grades and relationships are important, the most important thing to focus on in school is your health, both physical and mental. Nothing in high school matters more than one’s personal well being, so make sure to always take care of yourself and your mental health first. If your in need of resources, consider visiting the National Alience on Mental illnes @nami.org , or if struggling with LGTBQ+ issue consider visiting @thetrevorproject.org, and when in crisis vist the National Suicide Prevention hotline at 1-800-273-8255.

Scary, exhilarating, fulfilling, and nerve wracking can all provide an accurate depiction of the initial transition to high school life. The best thing about the four year experience is it is completely different for everyone. No two people will have the exact same high school experiences, so while you can, take the chance to make it yours. Go to football games, join a club, get to know your teachers, try new things, and ask for help when needed.  We are all Lions here.

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